Resume

(pdf version)

Areas of Specialisation

Philosophy of Language, Epistemology, Metaphysics.

Areas of Competence

Critical Thinking, Formal Logic, Philosophical Logic, Formal Semantics, Philosophy of Mind, Philosophy of Science, Frege, Metaethics, Applied Ethics.

Education

Oxford University, Doctor of Philosophy, 2007.
Thesis: ‘The Meaning of ‘Look’’
Supervisor: Timothy Williamson

I develop a theory of what we mean by sentences such as ‘Patch looks red’ and ‘John looks to be tired’ – sentences that we use to describe how things (visually) appear. Apart from being a contribution to issues in the philosophy of language, it is also a contribution to issues in the philosophy of perception – having such a theory in hand we can make better progress toward answering certain questions about perception. I illustrate by considering two such questions: Is the relation expressed by ‘looks the same as’ transitive? What is the nature of visual experience?

Oxford University, Bachelor of Philosophy, 2003.
Concentrations: Philosophical Logic and Philosophy of Language, Metaphysics and Epistemology, Frege.

Sydney University, Graduate Diploma of Arts (Philosophy), First Class Honours, 2000.

Melbourne University, Graduate Diploma of Education, 1995.

Sydney University, Master of Science (Pure Mathematics), 1991.

Sydney University, Bachelor of Science (Pure Mathematics), First Class Honours, 1989.

Publications

‘Look’ Sentences and Visual Experience, book forthcoming with OUP.

‘Abitrary Reference’, forthcoming in Philosophical Studies.

‘The Metaphysical Impact of Semantic Theories’, forthcoming in Philosophy Compass.

‘Epistemic Modality’, forthcoming in Philosophy Compass.

‘Against one Reason for Thinking that Visual Experiences have Representational Content’, Philosophical Perspectives, 2007 issue (Philosophy of Mind).

‘Chains, Multichains and Möbius Numbers’, Journal of Discrete Mathematics 120 (1993), pp. 37-50. (With K. Varadarajan and K. Wehrhahn.)

‘Lattice Paths and Catalan Numbers’, Bulletin of the Institute of Combinatorics and its Applications 1 (1991), pp. 41-55. (With H. Gastineau-Hills, A. Nelson, P. Bos, G. Calvert, and K. Wehrhahn.)

Presentations

‘Knowing How’, UNSW Workshop on Knowing How, July 2011.

‘Women are Bad Drivers’, CSU Humanities Seminar, May 2011.

‘Three Questions about our Use of Arguments’, ANU RSSS Department Seminar, March 2011.

‘Knowing How’, CSU Department Seminar, March 2011.

‘Against Committing’, CSU Department Seminar, August 2010.

‘Arbitrary Reference’, Macquarie University Department Seminar, May 2010.

‘Eavesdroppers, Salvage Ships, and Epistemic Modality’, ANU RSSS Department Seminar, May 2009.

‘The Nature of Visual Experience’, Cornell Department Discussion Club, October 2008.

‘Arbitrary Reference’, Cornell University Department Workshop, March 2008.

‘Intellectual Bullying’, Cornell University Mellon Seminar, March 2008.

‘Ways in the Semantics of English’, Cornell University Semantics Seminar, February 2008.

‘Jackson on the Adverbial Theory’, Cornell University Perception Seminar, September 2007.

‘Making’, Cornell University Departmental Workshop, September 2007.

‘Arbitrary Reference and Vagueness’ (with Ofra Magidor), Oxford University Ockham Society, March 2007.

‘Word Meaning’, Oxford University Ockham Society, November 2006.

‘Lexical Categories’, Oxford University Linguistics Graduate Seminar, October 2006.

‘The Meaning of ‘look’’, Sydney University Departmental Seminar, May 2006.

‘Word Conversion and Lexical Categories’, Charles Sturt University Departmental Seminar, April 2006.

‘On the Meaning of ‘Red’’, Oxford University Ockham Society, Oxford, May 2004.

‘On How Things Look’, Oxford University Ockham Society, November 2002.

‘Is there an Exclusive ‘Or’?’, Oxford University Ockham Society, March 2002.

(The Ockham Society is a forum in which graduate students from Oxford and elsewhere present their work.)

Positions Held

At Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, from July 2010:
Lecturer in Philosophy

At Sydney University, March 2010 – June 2010:
Casual Lecturer

Courses taught:
PHIL 2606 Knowledge, Reason and Action

At Macquarie University, March 2010 – June 2010:
Casual Lecturer

Courses taught:
PHL 137 Critical Thinking
PHL 280 Truth and Reality

At The University of New South Wales, July 2009 – November 2009:
Casual Lecturer

Courses taught:
PHIL 2109 Contemporary Metaphysics
PHIL 2206 Philosophy of Mind

At Cornell University, July 2007 – June 2009:
Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow and Visiting Assistant Professor

Courses taught:
PHIL 332 Philosophy of Language, Fall 2007
PHIL 331 Deductive Logic, Spring 2008
PHIL 3710 Philosophy of Language, Fall 2008
PHIL 6710 Epistemic Modals, Spring 2009

Teaching Experience as a Graduate Student

At Oxford University, April 2007 – June 2007:
Lecturer in Philosophy at Exeter College. Taught junior and senior level courses in formal logic, philosophical logic, philosophy of language, epistemology, and metaphysics. (At Oxford, tutorial teaching is the primary mode of undergraduate teaching.)

At Oxford University, October 2006 – March 2007:
Lecturer in Philosophy at Oriel College. Taught junior and senior level courses in formal logic, philosophical logic, philosophy of language, epistemology, and metaphysics.

At Sydney University, July – September, 2006:
Lecturer in the Department of Philosophy. Taught a senior level course in epistemology to a class of 25 students (the nature of knowledge, skepticism, and perception).

At Macquarie University, May – June, 2006:
Lecturer in the Department of Philosophy. Taught a senior level course in modal logic to a class of 10 students (possible worlds, formal systems, actualism, and temporal and deontic logic), and a junior level course in the philosophy of mind to a class of 15 students (the nature of minds and computers and the connection between them).

At The University of New South Wales, February, 2006:
Tutor in the Department of Philosophy. Tutored a senior level course covering critical thinking, scepticism, truth, free will, and the nature of scientific theory.

At The University of Warwick, Spring Term, 2005:
Lecturer in the Department of Philosophy. Taught a senior level course in the philosophy of language to a class of 20 students (meaning, metaphor, language of thought, quantification, events, indirect discourse, conditionals, and truth).

At Oxford University, 2001 – 2005:
Tutor in the Department of Philosophy. Tutored junior and senior level students in formal logic, epistemology, and metaphysics.

At Sydney University, 2000:
Tutor in the Department of Philosophy. Tutored a class of 25 students in introductory formal logic.

Other Teaching Experience

At Geelong Grammar School, 1992 – 1997:
Secondary school teacher of mathematics, physics, science, computing, and Japanese. Taught students ranging in age from 12 to 18, and ranging in ability from the very weak to the gifted (some of whom competed in the International Math and Chemistry Olympiads). Assistant Head of a boarding house, with a significant pastoral care role. Coach of various sports, and organiser of various activities. Obtained a degree in education from Melbourne University.

At Sydney University, 1987 – 1991:
Casual tutor in the department of mathematics between 1989 and 1991. Tutored classes of up to 30 students from junior to senior level, in topics including calculus, combinatorics, differential geometry, and linear algebra. Tutor in mathematics at St. Paul’s residential college during 1989, responsible for the progress of all mathematics students in the college. Laboratory demonstrator in the physics department during 1990. Tutor at JA Maths Coaching, from 1987 to 1988, tutoring high school mathematics to small groups for 4 hours each week.

Graduate Courses Taken

Topics in Metaphysics, Timothy Williamson and John Hawthorne, 2007.
Armchairs and Sofas, Timothy Williamson, 2007.
Metaphysics, Language, and Epistemology Seminar, Ralph Wedgwood, 2007.
Probability Theory, Frank Arntzenius, 2006.
Singular Thought, John Hawthorne, 2006.
Metaphysics, Language, and Epistemology Seminar, John Hawthorne, 2006.
Lexical Semantics and Lexical Pragmatics, David Cram, 2004.
Syntax, Mary Dalrymple, 2004.
Formal Semantics, Stephen Pulman, 2004.
Syntax: Minimalism, Gillian Ramchand, 2003.
Metaphysics and Epistemology B.Phil. Seminar, Bill Brewer and David Charles, 2003.
Logic and Language B.Phil. Seminar, Timothy Williamson and Ben Morison, 2002.
Frege, tutorials with Ian Rumfitt, 2002.
Metaphysics and Epistemology B.Phil. Seminar, Bill Brewer and David Charles, 2002.
Logic and Language B.Phil. Seminar, Timothy Williamson and Ian Rumfitt, 2001.
First Year Graduate Seminar, Timothy Williamson and David Charles, 2001/2.

Awards and Prizes

At Oxford:

John Locke Prize, 2001.
Awarded annually to an Oxford graduate student on the basis of written examination.

At Sydney University:

John Anderson Prize, 2000.
For the best thesis in final year.

Honours Prize, 2000.
For distinguished results leading to final year.

Lithgow Prize, 1999.
For the best results in third year.

Uther Prize, 1989.
For distinguished results and service to others.

Foundation Grant, 1988.
For academic achievement and contribution to university life.

Physics Prize, 1987.
For distinguished results in second year.

Service

Referee for Mind, Philosophical Review, Southern Journal of Philosophy, and Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.

Book Review Committee, Philosophical Review, 2007 - 2009.

Chair of the Graduate Joint Consultative Committee, Oxford, 2002 - 2004.
(Responsible for ensuring that the needs of graduate students are looked after by the Philosophy Faculty, and for chairing and writing minutes for the termly committee meetings.)

Organiser of The Ockham Society, Oxford, 2002 - 2003.
(Responsible for selecting speakers for each of the 24 meetings during the year, for advertising, organising, and chairing each of the meetings, and for maintaining the society website.)

New College graduate student welfare officer, 2002 - 2003.
(Responsible to gradute students of the college as their first point of contact for personal welfare issues, and for promoting student well-being by being available to chat and by organising a variety of social functions.)

Referees

Timothy Williamson, Oxford University, timothy.williamson@philosophy.ox.ac.uk.
John Hawthorne, Oxford University, john.hawthorne@philosophy.ox.ac.uk.
Bill Brewer, The University of Warwick, B.Brewer@warwick.ac.uk.
Mats Rooth, Cornell University, mr249@cornell.edu.
Derk Pereboom, Cornell University, dp346@cornell.edu.